A place for architecture students to humorously laugh about the glories of our daily lives.
Share your stress, habits, opinions, happiness, experience, etc.

August 28 2014, 12:29 PM

CAN ARCHITECTURE HELP SUSTAIN A CITY?
I think architecture can definitely help in this new ‘sustainable’ living our generation is in!
I would suggest you take a look at this huge project going on in Dubai called Masdar City. The city relies on solar energy and other renewable energy sources to keep functioning. It’s really fascinating to have an entire city run solely on natural energy. The architecture is a part of this process too!
-Jess

CAN ARCHITECTURE HELP SUSTAIN A CITY?

I think architecture can definitely help in this new ‘sustainable’ living our generation is in!

I would suggest you take a look at this huge project going on in Dubai called Masdar City. The city relies on solar energy and other renewable energy sources to keep functioning. It’s really fascinating to have an entire city run solely on natural energy. The architecture is a part of this process too!

-Jess

August 27 2014, 12:20 PM

9 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  architecture school  admin post  

Who here goes to Woodbury in LA?

August 26 2014, 08:17 AM

archistudent:

So this happened.
[Thanks, Rachel for the image :D]

WE’RE JUST TRYING TO EAT WITHOUT LEAVING STUDIO

archistudent:

So this happened.

[Thanks, Rachel for the image :D]

WE’RE JUST TRYING TO EAT WITHOUT LEAVING STUDIO

August 25 2014, 02:22 PM

My friend Mark wrote an excellent post specifically on entrance portfolios. In this post there is also a link to his other portfolio based posts!
I can never thank Mark enough for writing that!!
——
Admissions look for a variety of work, different methods of creativity.

My friend Mark wrote an excellent post specifically on entrance portfolios. In this post there is also a link to his other portfolio based posts!

I can never thank Mark enough for writing that!!

——

Admissions look for a variety of work, different methods of creativity.

August 25 2014, 02:14 PM

21 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  clog  architecture student  architect  design  book  studio  question  
I don’t read “magazines” but I do subscribe to Clog which is published quarterly. They have great topics and excellent content.

What do you guys subscribe to?

I don’t read “magazines” but I do subscribe to Clog which is published quarterly. They have great topics and excellent content.

What do you guys subscribe to?

August 25 2014, 02:07 PM

Yea, that’s how I feel right now too.
My school offers a M.Arch program that not everyone applied/got accepted to. A lot of friends during our undergrad are not going to be with us in the graduate program and it sucks.

Yea, that’s how I feel right now too.

My school offers a M.Arch program that not everyone applied/got accepted to. A lot of friends during our undergrad are not going to be with us in the graduate program and it sucks.

August 25 2014, 01:39 PM

Don’t worry about not having any prior experience, there are a ton of people who go into architecture school blindly. Some people pick it up really well while others drop out quicker than you can say architecture.
In the first month of architecture school you will find out if it’s for you or not. I hope it works out!
I’ve made a post on recommended architectural books. Take a look and find some reviews online to see which ones you can start off with.
-Jess

Don’t worry about not having any prior experience, there are a ton of people who go into architecture school blindly. Some people pick it up really well while others drop out quicker than you can say architecture.

In the first month of architecture school you will find out if it’s for you or not. I hope it works out!

I’ve made a post on recommended architectural books. Take a look and find some reviews online to see which ones you can start off with.

-Jess

August 21 2014, 08:27 AM

PAID TRAINING PERIOD?
All State architectural registration boards require architecture graduates to complete a training period—usually at least 3 years—before they may sit for the licensing exam. These standards stipulate broad training under the supervision of a licensed architect. Most new graduates complete their training period by working as interns at architectural firms. Some States allow a portion of the training to occur in the offices of related professionals, such as engineers or general contractors. Architecture students who complete internships while still in school can count some of that time toward the 3-year training period.
——-
Find positions/internships that are paid!

PAID TRAINING PERIOD?

All State architectural registration boards require architecture graduates to complete a training period—usually at least 3 years—before they may sit for the licensing exam. These standards stipulate broad training under the supervision of a licensed architect. Most new graduates complete their training period by working as interns at architectural firms. Some States allow a portion of the training to occur in the offices of related professionals, such as engineers or general contractors. Architecture students who complete internships while still in school can count some of that time toward the 3-year training period.

——-

Find positions/internships that are paid!

August 20 2014, 03:46 PM

171 notes   •  VIA: tytytym   •   SOURCE: tytytym
Filed Under:  architecture  archito  
tytytym:

yeah, I feel that way too

tytytym:

yeah, I feel that way too

August 20 2014, 03:28 PM

64 notes  Filed Under:  question  architecture  design  architect  architecture school  
CHOOSING NOT TO BECOME AN ARCHITECT AFTER STUDYING ARCHITECTURE?
Not everyone with an architecture degree becomes an architect, whether they chose not to or life takes them a different path. Eighty percent of my co-workers in my department (including me) have an architectural background, with Master and Bachelor degrees, yet here we are in a construction company working as VDC modelers. Yes some of us plan on furthering our careers and registering as architects while others are just more interested in the construction industry.
There are several kids that I graduated with that are getting their Masters in Construction Management instead of Architecture.
A co-worker of mine has a B.Arch but he’s really interested in computer programing and such, he wants to get a Masters in programing.
To obtain an architectural degree is difficult. It tests your patience, your mental strength, your drive, your commitment, your motivation, etc. These are all qualities that we can take to pursue other things without feeling guilty for going through architecture school and not using the degree.
My director first looks through applicants with an architectural background because she knows what it takes to go through architecture school; as do a lot of people in the industry. That says something about architecture students.
-Jess

CHOOSING NOT TO BECOME AN ARCHITECT AFTER STUDYING ARCHITECTURE?

Not everyone with an architecture degree becomes an architect, whether they chose not to or life takes them a different path. Eighty percent of my co-workers in my department (including me) have an architectural background, with Master and Bachelor degrees, yet here we are in a construction company working as VDC modelers. Yes some of us plan on furthering our careers and registering as architects while others are just more interested in the construction industry.

There are several kids that I graduated with that are getting their Masters in Construction Management instead of Architecture.

A co-worker of mine has a B.Arch but he’s really interested in computer programing and such, he wants to get a Masters in programing.

To obtain an architectural degree is difficult. It tests your patience, your mental strength, your drive, your commitment, your motivation, etc. These are all qualities that we can take to pursue other things without feeling guilty for going through architecture school and not using the degree.

My director first looks through applicants with an architectural background because she knows what it takes to go through architecture school; as do a lot of people in the industry. That says something about architecture students.

-Jess

August 20 2014, 11:20 AM

47 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  design  listen  listening  posts  creative  

How to Be a Creative Listener
Photo: Listen designed by Rémy Médard from the Noun Project

International design firm IDEO created a four-part podcast series on Creative Listening for the 2014 Aspen Ideas Festival. In a total of 30 minutes, you can learn key habits for better listening:

How to utilize your intuition: Sometimes too much information is just that. It can be overwhelming and logic can only get you so far. That’s when you need to trust your gut and ask, “What’s really important here?” “What’s going on behind the surface, the unsaid versus the said?”
How to hone your interpretation skills: Industry jargon and wordy explanations often mask the true value of something. Learning how to distill a message down to its essence, into simple, understandable language isn’t “dumbing it down,” it’s giving it wings…
And finally, learn how to amp up your curiosity: Curiosity pushes us beyond what we know and challenges us to look at long-held beliefs in a new light. Staying curious—always asking “Why?” like an earnest preschooler—is a critical muscle that needs to be continuously flexed if you want to have new, game-changing ideas.

By actively listening, you can find valuable information to inspire new ideas. The podcasts are rich in examples where innovative ideas have come to light because they listened to more than what was being said. As writer G. K. Chesteron noted, “There’s a lot of difference between listening and hearing.”

How to Be a Creative Listener

Photo: Listen designed by Rémy Médard from the Noun Project

International design firm IDEO created a four-part podcast series on Creative Listening for the 2014 Aspen Ideas Festival. In a total of 30 minutes, you can learn key habits for better listening:

How to utilize your intuition: Sometimes too much information is just that. It can be overwhelming and logic can only get you so far. That’s when you need to trust your gut and ask, “What’s really important here?” “What’s going on behind the surface, the unsaid versus the said?”

How to hone your interpretation skills: Industry jargon and wordy explanations often mask the true value of something. Learning how to distill a message down to its essence, into simple, understandable language isn’t “dumbing it down,” it’s giving it wings…

And finally, learn how to amp up your curiosity: Curiosity pushes us beyond what we know and challenges us to look at long-held beliefs in a new light. Staying curious—always asking “Why?” like an earnest preschooler—is a critical muscle that needs to be continuously flexed if you want to have new, game-changing ideas.

By actively listening, you can find valuable information to inspire new ideas. The podcasts are rich in examples where innovative ideas have come to light because they listened to more than what was being said. As writer G. K. Chesteron noted, “There’s a lot of difference between listening and hearing.”

August 20 2014, 08:49 AM

22 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  question  cv  resourceful links  

There is one big cultural difference between the Italians and the English, which is especially true in job a interview. This is, basically, that in business Italian people tend to be too formal. In Italy, of course, it’s perfectly normal to be quite formal in a business situation, particularly when you don’t know the other person.

Being too formal in an English business interview is a mistake, and here’s why:

People in business in English-speaking countries are generally more informal and relaxed with people they don’t know. You don’t need to spend a long time establishing a personal relationship with a business counterpart in order to overcome the barrier of formality. While the British are slightly more formal than the Americans, it is still generally the cases that in a business setting people try and get to an informal level of communication as soon as possible. Why? It’s simple: because it’s easier to do business with someone without a lot of unnecessary formality. Yes, we wear suits and shake hands. But you will find that pretty much as soon as you sit down with your interviewer and start talking, they will try to establish an informal, one-to-one style of communication.

I think another important difference is that very few Italian people have a personal profile at the beginning of their CV. For example, if you are engineer who has worked with other people on a lot of different projects and you can explain very technical information to your clients, you could write:

Resourceful engineering professional with significant experience of leading teams on successful projects. I can communicate complex information in a clear, simple way and build strong relationships with clients.

It’s often the case that other people applying for the same job have similar qualifications and professional backgrounds. What sets you apart (differentiates you) from other candidates, therefore, is your personal profile (and your covering letter).

I hope this helps!

-Jess

August 20 2014, 08:20 AM

11 notes  Filed Under:  admin post  

I think I’m going to need help running this blog while I’m doing M.Arch

Possibly?

August 19 2014, 03:30 PM

Architecture School Never Stops

I literally just graduated this past Saturday with my Bachelors and received an email last night with my first assignment for Thesis Prep due September 12.

Architecture school doesn’t give me a moment to breathe!

Classes hasn’t even officially started and I already have a ton of reading and an assignment! It’s technically still summer vacation but that’s basically out the door now.

Oh architecture. Cheers!

August 19 2014, 08:13 AM

Hunch 6/7: 109 Provisional Attempts to Address Six Simple And Hard Questions About What Architects Do Today And Where Their Profession Might Go Tomorrow

Hunch 6/7: 109 Provisional Attempts to Address Six Simple And Hard Questions About What Architects Do Today And Where Their Profession Might Go Tomorrow