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September 22 2014, 08:13 PM

NCARB announces major changes to IDP program | Via

Important stuff for internship down the road everyone!
The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) announced today that it will be making significant changes to its Intern Development Program (IDP). Separate from other considerations to change the IDP’s terminology, this decision chiefly includes two phases: (1) the removal of “elective” hourly requirements, and (2) condensing IDP’s experience areas from the current 17 into six “practice-based categories”, linked to future sections planned for the revised Architect Registration Examination (ARE) 5.0. These changes will be implemented beginning mid-2015 and mid-2016, respectively.
By removing the “elective” IDP hours, NCARB is decreasing the total required from 5,600 to 3,740 (still based on the seventeen “core experience areas”, until ARE 5.0 is in place). NCARB reportedly made this decision to cut down on the average amount of years it takes “interns” to become licensed. The current average is more than seven — five years for IDP and another 2.2 to complete the ARE. Under the revised IDP, NCARB estimates an average of three to four years to complete the program.
In mid-2016, the ARE’s “experience categories” will be downsized to the six outlined in 2012 NCARB Practice Analysis of Architecture (page 40), and then officially implemented through ARE 5.0 in late 2016. The revisions are meant to reflect updates in the way architectural practice works today (emphasizing developments in technology and information communications).
NCARB also stresses that in order to actually realize whatever changes it makes to IDP, the adjustments must be enforced by its 54 jurisdictional boards across the U.S.
Here’s the complete text from NCARB’s official statement:
WASHINGTON, D.C., September 22, 2014 — The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) has voted to approve significant changes that will streamline and overhaul the Intern Development Program (IDP), which most states require to satisfy experience requirements for initial licensure as an architect. The changes will only be applicable where adoption has occurred by individual jurisdictional licensing boards.
The changes will be implemented in two phases. The first will streamline the program by focusing on the IDP’s core requirements and removing its elective requirements. The second phase will condense the 17 current experience areas into six practice-based categories that will also correspond with the divisions tested in the Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®).
NCARB announced the proposals to modify the IDP in late June at its Annual Business Meeting, which was attended by representatives of its 54 member jurisdiction boards that oversee architect licensing in their states or territories. After reviewing the feedback from the boards, the Board of Directors voted to move forward with both proposals for implementation in mid-2015 and mid-2016.
“Streamlining of the IDP requirements will reduce complexities while ensuring that intern architects still acquire the comprehensive experience that is essential for competent practice, and result in a program that is both justifiable and defensible,” said NCARB President Dale McKinney, FAIA.
Phase 1: Focusing on Core Requirements
The IDP currently requires interns to document 5,600 hours of experience, with 3,740 of those hours as core requirements in specific architectural experience areas. The remaining 1,860 hours are elective hours. The first reinvention phase will streamline the IDP by removing the elective hour requirement, with interns documenting only the 3,740 hours in the 17 core experience areas.
In making its decision to eliminate the elective hours, the Board considered several important statistics:
The average intern currently takes five years to complete the hours required for IDP and another 2.2 years to complete the ARE, totaling an average of more than seven years from graduation to licensure. 
With this reduction in required IDP hours, it is likely that the average intern will take roughly three to four years to complete their IDP requirements following this change. 
Combined with the time required to complete the ARE, the Board anticipates that the average intern will have five to six years of post-graduation experience prior to qualifying for initial licensure. 
Implementation and Jurisdictional Adoption NCARB expects to implement the first phase on or before June 2015. Many states will need to formally adopt the streamlined program because of how experience requirements for licensure are written in their laws or rules.
“Our planning efforts will include development of a campaign to inform interns of the importance of understanding the variables in jurisdictional laws and rules related to the experience requirement when considering where they will apply for licensure,” McKinney said.
Phase 2: Aligning Internship and Examination
The Board also agreed to a future realignment of the framework of IDP requirements into six experience categories reflecting the six general areas of practice, which were identified by the2012 NCARB Practice Analysis of Architecture. These changes will mirror the six divisions of a future version of the licensing exam, known as ARE 5.0.
NCARB’s internship-related committees will provide guidance on mapping the existing requirements into the new, overhauled format. This work should be completed and ready for introduction in mid-2016, before the launch of ARE 5.0 in late 2016.
-RP

NCARB announces major changes to IDP program | Via

Important stuff for internship down the road everyone!

The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) announced today that it will be making significant changes to its Intern Development Program (IDP). Separate from other considerations to change the IDP’s terminology, this decision chiefly includes two phases: (1) the removal of “elective” hourly requirements, and (2) condensing IDP’s experience areas from the current 17 into six “practice-based categories”, linked to future sections planned for the revised Architect Registration Examination (ARE) 5.0. These changes will be implemented beginning mid-2015 and mid-2016, respectively.

By removing the “elective” IDP hours, NCARB is decreasing the total required from 5,600 to 3,740 (still based on the seventeen “core experience areas”, until ARE 5.0 is in place). NCARB reportedly made this decision to cut down on the average amount of years it takes “interns” to become licensed. The current average is more than seven — five years for IDP and another 2.2 to complete the ARE. Under the revised IDP, NCARB estimates an average of three to four years to complete the program.

In mid-2016, the ARE’s “experience categories” will be downsized to the six outlined in 2012 NCARB Practice Analysis of Architecture (page 40), and then officially implemented through ARE 5.0 in late 2016. The revisions are meant to reflect updates in the way architectural practice works today (emphasizing developments in technology and information communications).

NCARB also stresses that in order to actually realize whatever changes it makes to IDP, the adjustments must be enforced by its 54 jurisdictional boards across the U.S.

Here’s the complete text from NCARB’s official statement:

WASHINGTON, D.C., September 22, 2014 — The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) has voted to approve significant changes that will streamline and overhaul the Intern Development Program (IDP), which most states require to satisfy experience requirements for initial licensure as an architect. The changes will only be applicable where adoption has occurred by individual jurisdictional licensing boards.

The changes will be implemented in two phases. The first will streamline the program by focusing on the IDP’s core requirements and removing its elective requirements. The second phase will condense the 17 current experience areas into six practice-based categories that will also correspond with the divisions tested in the Architect Registration Examination® (ARE®).

NCARB announced the proposals to modify the IDP in late June at its Annual Business Meeting, which was attended by representatives of its 54 member jurisdiction boards that oversee architect licensing in their states or territories. After reviewing the feedback from the boards, the Board of Directors voted to move forward with both proposals for implementation in mid-2015 and mid-2016.

“Streamlining of the IDP requirements will reduce complexities while ensuring that intern architects still acquire the comprehensive experience that is essential for competent practice, and result in a program that is both justifiable and defensible,” said NCARB President Dale McKinney, FAIA.

Phase 1: Focusing on Core Requirements

The IDP currently requires interns to document 5,600 hours of experience, with 3,740 of those hours as core requirements in specific architectural experience areas. The remaining 1,860 hours are elective hours. The first reinvention phase will streamline the IDP by removing the elective hour requirement, with interns documenting only the 3,740 hours in the 17 core experience areas.

In making its decision to eliminate the elective hours, the Board considered several important statistics:

  • The average intern currently takes five years to complete the hours required for IDP and another 2.2 years to complete the ARE, totaling an average of more than seven years from graduation to licensure. 
  • With this reduction in required IDP hours, it is likely that the average intern will take roughly three to four years to complete their IDP requirements following this change. 
  • Combined with the time required to complete the ARE, the Board anticipates that the average intern will have five to six years of post-graduation experience prior to qualifying for initial licensure. 

Implementation and Jurisdictional Adoption 
NCARB expects to implement the first phase on or before June 2015. Many states will need to formally adopt the streamlined program because of how experience requirements for licensure are written in their laws or rules.

“Our planning efforts will include development of a campaign to inform interns of the importance of understanding the variables in jurisdictional laws and rules related to the experience requirement when considering where they will apply for licensure,” McKinney said.

Phase 2: Aligning Internship and Examination

The Board also agreed to a future realignment of the framework of IDP requirements into six experience categories reflecting the six general areas of practice, which were identified by the2012 NCARB Practice Analysis of Architecture. These changes will mirror the six divisions of a future version of the licensing exam, known as ARE 5.0.

NCARB’s internship-related committees will provide guidance on mapping the existing requirements into the new, overhauled format. This work should be completed and ready for introduction in mid-2016, before the launch of ARE 5.0 in late 2016.

-RP

September 22 2014, 11:49 AM

71 notes  
Talk about innovation

Talk about innovation

September 21 2014, 10:49 AM

128 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  ideas  
#architecture begins with #ideas (at Nasjonalmuseet - Arkitektur)

#architecture begins with #ideas (at Nasjonalmuseet - Arkitektur)

September 20 2014, 07:06 AM

447 notes  Filed Under:  music  architecture  
#architecture and #music (at Oslo Opera House)

#architecture and #music (at Oslo Opera House)

September 19 2014, 05:23 AM

35 notes  
On a flight to norway but still have thesis work…. might as well enjoy it with some wine.

On a flight to norway but still have thesis work…. might as well enjoy it with some wine.

September 18 2014, 03:27 PM

21 Rules for a Successful Life in Architecture (+ An Extra one!) | Via
Get Started on Your Career Path
You can start earning IDP hours right after high school graduation.
If you haven’t already, sign up for IDP and get started on the path to licensure!
Don’t Get Caught Up in “Old Guard” Firms
The youth are the future.
Firms need to embrace the ideas, energy and enthusiasm of young people.
Be observant as to what the Millennials in the office are doing.
Make sure emerging professionals are valued in the firms you are interviewing with for full-time employment.
Networking = The Key to Advancement

Get to know everyone in the Architecture community and allied fields (all ages and experience levels).
Don’t underestimate the value of AIA membership and networking opportunities.
Don’t Get Upset by Clients that Think They Know Everything About Architecture

Be patient.
Educate and show multiple options (divergent thought processes) to open up thinking.
Be a professional.
Remember that you were educated as an ARCHITECT (not him/her).
Don’t Burn Bridges

The Architectural world is way too small.
Your actions and decisions will be remembered.
Look Out for #1

It is your career and yours alone.
Make sure you are getting the appropriate experience (IDP), opportunities and compensation.
If you aren’t, MOVE ON!!!
Voice Your Opinions

The best ideas are never incorporated into projects unless they are heard, presented, and defended.
Many processes in firms and details on projects can be improved if you simply point out a better solution to decision makers.
An improvement is always appreciated by principals and clients.
You Must Design Your Career and Position

All of us are Unique = Unique jobs/positions
Continually reflect on your experiences to determine what you really want to do.
Make career decisions to attain this position.
Differentiate Yourself

Develop your unique skills and abilities.
Demonstrate how they make you a better employee and contributor.
Potentially utilize these skills to go out on your own.
Don’t Confuse an Internship with Full-Time Employment

An internship introduces you to how a firm and projects work.
Full-time employment mandates responsibility for your work and productivity (deadlines).
Full-time employment = STRESS!!!
Technology Will Lead the Way

You must stay at the forefront of technology.
Volunteer to learn new software and lead firm implementation.
Learn BIM (Revit) and become proficient while in school.
Sustainability is Your Calling and Opportunity

If you endeavor to learn a lot about sustainability while in school, you will be able to share your knowledge with current practitioners and become peers.
Take the sustainability lead within your firm.
Become a LEED Green Associate while in school.
You Need to be a Champion of Sustainability Built Environments

You must educate EVERYONE about sustainability.
Future clients will be the result.
Build Community

Only 2% can afford the services of an Architect.
What are you doing to help the other 98%?
Get involved in your community.
Save the Profession

Architects aren’t compensated fairly because the general public doesn’t value (or know) what we do.
Teach-Share-Show-Demonstrate to others how we improve the world.
Education Doesn’t End in School

You must continually learn to stay at the forefront of materials, systems and technology.
Don’t let the world pass you by.
Mentor

Help teach the next generation.
A two-way street (look up, look back).
You will learn something in the process, and be reminded why you joined this profession.
Never Get Grumpy

Continually be inspired by the next generation and harness their optimism and energy.
Be a positive and optimistic employee.
Fix Something

The world is full of problems.
Choose one or two things, and fix them.
Complete the Task

You set out to become an Architect… so take the A.R.E. and become one.
Keep your eyes on the prize!!!
Final Thought

You set out to become an Architect… so take the A.R.E. and become one.
Keep your eyes on the prize!!!

+ And Have Fun!
-RP

21 Rules for a Successful Life in Architecture (+ An Extra one!) | Via

Get Started on Your Career Path

  • You can start earning IDP hours right after high school graduation.
  • If you haven’t already, sign up for IDP and get started on the path to licensure!

Don’t Get Caught Up in “Old Guard” Firms

  • The youth are the future.
  • Firms need to embrace the ideas, energy and enthusiasm of young people.
  • Be observant as to what the Millennials in the office are doing.
  • Make sure emerging professionals are valued in the firms you are interviewing with for full-time employment.

Networking = The Key to Advancement

  • Get to know everyone in the Architecture community and allied fields (all ages and experience levels).
  • Don’t underestimate the value of AIA membership and networking opportunities.

Don’t Get Upset by Clients that Think They Know Everything About Architecture

  • Be patient.
  • Educate and show multiple options (divergent thought processes) to open up thinking.
  • Be a professional.
  • Remember that you were educated as an ARCHITECT (not him/her).

Don’t Burn Bridges

  • The Architectural world is way too small.
  • Your actions and decisions will be remembered.

Look Out for #1

  • It is your career and yours alone.
  • Make sure you are getting the appropriate experience (IDP), opportunities and compensation.
  • If you aren’t, MOVE ON!!!

Voice Your Opinions

  • The best ideas are never incorporated into projects unless they are heard, presented, and defended.
  • Many processes in firms and details on projects can be improved if you simply point out a better solution to decision makers.
  • An improvement is always appreciated by principals and clients.

You Must Design Your Career and Position

  • All of us are Unique = Unique jobs/positions
  • Continually reflect on your experiences to determine what you really want to do.
  • Make career decisions to attain this position.

Differentiate Yourself

  • Develop your unique skills and abilities.
  • Demonstrate how they make you a better employee and contributor.
  • Potentially utilize these skills to go out on your own.

Don’t Confuse an Internship with Full-Time Employment

  • An internship introduces you to how a firm and projects work.
  • Full-time employment mandates responsibility for your work and productivity (deadlines).
  • Full-time employment = STRESS!!!

Technology Will Lead the Way

  • You must stay at the forefront of technology.
  • Volunteer to learn new software and lead firm implementation.
  • Learn BIM (Revit) and become proficient while in school.

Sustainability is Your Calling and Opportunity

  • If you endeavor to learn a lot about sustainability while in school, you will be able to share your knowledge with current practitioners and become peers.
  • Take the sustainability lead within your firm.
  • Become a LEED Green Associate while in school.

You Need to be a Champion of Sustainability Built Environments

  • You must educate EVERYONE about sustainability.
  • Future clients will be the result.

Build Community

  • Only 2% can afford the services of an Architect.
  • What are you doing to help the other 98%?
  • Get involved in your community.

Save the Profession

  • Architects aren’t compensated fairly because the general public doesn’t value (or know) what we do.
  • Teach-Share-Show-Demonstrate to others how we improve the world.

Education Doesn’t End in School

  • You must continually learn to stay at the forefront of materials, systems and technology.
  • Don’t let the world pass you by.

Mentor

  • Help teach the next generation.
  • A two-way street (look up, look back).
  • You will learn something in the process, and be reminded why you joined this profession.

Never Get Grumpy

  • Continually be inspired by the next generation and harness their optimism and energy.
  • Be a positive and optimistic employee.

Fix Something

  • The world is full of problems.
  • Choose one or two things, and fix them.

Complete the Task

  • You set out to become an Architect… so take the A.R.E. and become one.
  • Keep your eyes on the prize!!!

Final Thought

  • You set out to become an Architect… so take the A.R.E. and become one.
  • Keep your eyes on the prize!!!

+ And Have Fun!

-RP

September 18 2014, 09:47 AM

20 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  architecture school  question  
Jess and I both attend Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston, MA. There are a number of factors that come in to play when choosing a school. Location, program length, and specialties are just a few examples.It’s difficult to list off good architecture programs because I’ve only attended one but I’ve attached a link that breaks down what one might be looking to get out of architecture school. You can then base your decision off which schools provide the best program for you.

http://www.acsa-arch.org/resources/guide-to-architectural-education/overview/architecture-programs

Jess and I both attend Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston, MA. There are a number of factors that come in to play when choosing a school. Location, program length, and specialties are just a few examples.It’s difficult to list off good architecture programs because I’ve only attended one but I’ve attached a link that breaks down what one might be looking to get out of architecture school. You can then base your decision off which schools provide the best program for you.

http://www.acsa-arch.org/resources/guide-to-architectural-education/overview/architecture-programs

September 17 2014, 09:07 PM

#lifeofanarchitecturestudent #loaas #architecture

#lifeofanarchitecturestudent #loaas #architecture

September 17 2014, 01:22 PM

27 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  architecture school  question  books  
A graphic design course would be great to have when it comes time to create your portfolio.

As for books: 

101 Thing I Learned in Architecture School
By Mathew Frederick

Experiencing Architecture
By Steen Eiler Rasmussen

A graphic design course would be great to have when it comes time to create your portfolio.

As for books:

101 Thing I Learned in Architecture School
By Mathew Frederick

Experiencing Architecture
By Steen Eiler Rasmussen

September 17 2014, 01:12 PM

5 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  question  
http://eacea.ec.europa.eu/erasmus_mundus/results_compendia/selected_projects_action_1_master_courses_en.php

This should help you out. It appears to be a program where can choose more than one degree to receive a master’s in? Might be tough with the amount of work to be completed but you never truly know until you try…good luck!

http://eacea.ec.europa.eu/erasmus_mundus/results_compendia/selected_projects_action_1_master_courses_en.php

This should help you out. It appears to be a program where can choose more than one degree to receive a master’s in? Might be tough with the amount of work to be completed but you never truly know until you try…good luck!

September 17 2014, 12:41 PM

19 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  architecture school  design  studio  question  
Research and precedent studies are always great resources when in need of some guidence.

Perhaps your ideas are there but you’re having trouble representing them visually? Look to program tutorials to find that one technique to put your project over the top. Whether it’s photoshop, revit, or other rendering programs…a quick tutorial can create so many possibilities to bring your design to the next level.

Research and precedent studies are always great resources when in need of some guidence.

Perhaps your ideas are there but you’re having trouble representing them visually? Look to program tutorials to find that one technique to put your project over the top. Whether it’s photoshop, revit, or other rendering programs…a quick tutorial can create so many possibilities to bring your design to the next level.

September 17 2014, 12:21 PM

48 notes  
arkipampam: Hi guys! I'm in my 4th year of being a student of architecture.. but lately, I'm feeling down, and seems like I lost interest of studying architecture. It's not because I hate or didn't like the course, but I feel intimidated and left out with my classmates, I feel like I'm not belong to this course. I'm not happy anymore with it, and today, I received my 1st plate for this semester, but it failed. and it really depressed me.. do you think I should continue this course?

Hey there,

From my own personal experiences of ups and downs as an architecture student, I can honestly say it gets better. I’ve had moments where all I’ve wanted to do is quit and put down the pencil and straight edge and never look back. I’ve fallen victim to the all-nighters, poor diet, and stress levels that architecture as a whole has to offer which have contributed to feelings and doubts similar to yours.

What’s helped me through it is having someone to talk to about the issues we’re currently facing. As great as it might be to talk to other architecture students or professors…it may be beneficial to reach out to someone who has little to no affiliation with the major. They can offer a refreshing insight on the matter despite their lack of knowledge of the topic at hand.

Something I like to do is look back on all of the work I’ve completed over the past 4 years. I reassure myself that if I didn’t truly love what I was doing, then there is no way all of that work would have been completed.

Think about this…if you had chosen any other major, would you have put as much time and effort into it as you did for architecture?

It’s your 4th year which means you have 3 years of hard work and dedication under your belt already. My father always says, “Don’t slow down before the finish line…run through the tape with all you’ve got left.”

Holding that diploma is a satisfying feeling that I hope you’re willing to push through to experience as well.

Best of luck,

- Aaron

September 17 2014, 08:18 AM

When you have to make a seemingly small change that ruins all your drawing sets

thisarchitecturelife:

image

idea from thisadvertisinglife

September 16 2014, 09:00 PM

89 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  architecture school  memories  
UGH I KNOW!

UGH I KNOW!

September 16 2014, 06:31 PM

15 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  question  but not really  portfolio  
That’s really great to know! Thank you for your insights, hopefully this can give people ideas to join some summer programs to build up their portfolios.
-Jess

That’s really great to know! Thank you for your insights, hopefully this can give people ideas to join some summer programs to build up their portfolios.

-Jess