A place for architecture students to humorously laugh about the glories of our daily lives.
Share your stress, habits, opinions, happiness, experience, etc.

July 21 2014, 05:06 PM

Windows laptops, basic principles.

Hey Jess, just a heads up that almost all the information about PCs in the PC post is… well… wrong. Windows 8/8.1 Pro IS supported by Adobe / Autodesk - it’s Windows 8/8.1 RT that is not. This is due to the actual hardware being different, not a protest about Windows 8. Essentially ALL laptops run the “Pro” version of Windows8/8.1 and will run all the software Windows 7 does natively.

If you have a Windows 8/8.1 PC / Laptop and want to make your desktop a bit friendlier (IE, start menu) there are MANY start menu replacements; just have a Google. Also be sure you are running the most up to date software version (Windows 8.1 Update 1, it’s free) as there are many fixes that make Windows 8 much more mouse friendly!

Personally I use and enjoy using Windows 8.1, as once you get used to the new “modern” environment (or disable it…), it’s a functionally better OS, is more secure, as well as being less resource intensive. However, there is nothing wrong at all with Windows 7, should your machine be running that. Please bare in mind that Windows 8.1 vs Windows 7 vs OS X is for the most part a user preference - all have drawbacks, all have benefits. Pick the OS you like to use; a Mac is not going to make you a better designer, and a PC is not going to make you a worse one ;)

About actual machines, you have a few ’types’ of laptops… It’s perhaps easier to understand when compared to a more streamlined selection like Apples;

Ultrabooks:

These are pretty much MacBook Airs. Don’t buy one and expect to get serious work done. Sure Photoshop, 2D CAD, a little SketchUp will be possible, but you’re going to hit a performance ceiling really fast. These machines are designed for everyday tasks, email, browsing, some light content creation - not professional architecture software.

Entry Level:

Smaller, cheaper, less powerful machines like the 13 inch MacBook Pros (both retina and normal) fall into this category. These run on Dual Core i5 or i7 Intel CPUs, have integrated GPUs and usually have about 8GB of RAM (although this will vary per model). There are other differences like SSD vs HDD, “retina” vs “normal” displays, etc but that’s another discussion. Broad strokes here!

This type of machine will do you fine but you’ll still want to use the computer suite in your university. Photoshop, AutoCAD, InDesign (anything 2D) and a little 3D modelling should be perfectly possible - but due to the dual core CPU and the weaker GPU things like heavy 3D models and rendering are not going to go smoothly.

High End:

These machines will be spec’d similarly to Apples 15 inch MacBooks. They have Quad Core Intel i7 CPUs, Intel Iris (Integrated) GPUs, maybe a discrete NVidia GPU, at least 8GB of RAM (up to 16GB common), a good quality 15+ inch screen, and maybe even a Solid State Drive.

This is about as powerful as ‘consumer’ grade laptops get. If you want a machine that will handle almost anything you throw at it then this is your best bet.

You will pay for this kind of machine though, and such a powerful machine goes well beyond the “I want to do work on this” attitude, with such a machine it’s possible you wont need to use any computer suites at all.

Workstations:

These guys are the real-deal-no-compromise laptops, and Apple don’t sell anything like them. They are generally big, heavy, powerful and very expensive. Quad Core Intel i7 CPUs are standard (even more powerful chips available…), discrete NVidia Quadro or AMD Firebird GPUs, between 8 and 32Gb of RAM, Full HD to “retina” displays, SSDs very common etc etc.

All I’m going to say if all of the above is jargon to you then this is not a machine I would recommend you spend your money on. If you know you will push your machine to the absolute limit of what is possible on a laptop; it’s your money, do your research and enjoy your monster. But the average student running out and spending $$$$ on such a device when there is a computer suite filled with machines purpose built to make sure you don’t need to spent that money… well, it’s worth thinking about.

That list is the broad strokes of what kinds of machines are out there, there’s obviously everything in between… and everything below. It’s important you do your own research, buy a computer that suits your budget and usage - don’t spend £2k on a laptop when a £850 laptop would do you fine because you ”want to do renders” once a semester.

A few tips:

-Be sure the laptop you are buying has the current or last generation Intel i5 or i7 CPU (don’t go older, it wont last as long, don’t go for i3 or Pentium they’re not powerful enough).

-Be sure you are buying a laptop with a CPU with an “M” at the end of it’s unique name not a “U” or worse, a “Y”. “M” denotes that it is what is called a ‘full voltage’ CPU, in other words, it’s built for performance; unlike the “U” and “Y” (or ULV - ultra low voltage) series chips that denote a preference for battery life at the expense of throughput. (Intel Core i5-4200M Processor (3MB Cache, up to 3.10GHz) vs Intel Core i3-4010U Processor (3 MB Cache, 1,70 GHz) - which one is the correct choice?)

-Don’t underestimate the benefits of a high quality screen (ALL laptops shipped these days have “HD” screens, you want HD+ or FHD, or better).

- Try get at least 8GB of RAM, but you can often upgrade this later, find out if the RAM is user replaceable (Apples Retina MacBook Pros are a notable exception).

-Business class machines are not as pretty but last longer, have better warranties, use better components and often have more customisation options and less bloatware installed out-of-the-box… You will pay for these benefits, but don’t dismiss them as valuable features.

-An SSD can be a huge performance boost, if you’re debating getting a dual core  i7 over a i5 you’ll probably see better real world performance from upgrading the HDD for an SSD - it’ll cost about the same too.

-Your typical big brand high-street store will often rip you off. Know what you need, do your research, don’t get tricked into getting deal that sounds too good to be true - don’t spend more than you need to because the sales rep showed you their gaming laptops etc. Be smart.

Sorry for the worlds longest and most jargon heavy submission, but it really bothers me seeing people spending $$$$ on stuff they either don’t need or got conned into thinking is more valuable than it actually is (or less valuable). Your laptop could well be the most expensive single item you buy before starting uni, it’s important to understand what you’re getting so you can feel confident about it.

—————————

Awesome information about computers from anon!

Thanks for the submission ;)

July 21 2014, 01:14 PM

44 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  architecture school  architect  draft  drafting  sketch  studio  design  question  

TOP SUPPLIES FOR ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL 

I personally love using prismacolors and microns for drafting!
A while back I wrote about supplies for architecture school, great to check out for those who are incoming architecture students!

July 21 2014, 01:04 PM

Great advice! Thank you for sharing your experience!
Want to share yours? Send it to my inbox!

Great advice! Thank you for sharing your experience!

Want to share yours? Send it to my inbox!

July 21 2014, 10:25 AM

48 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  architect  architectural  creative  design  studio  creativity  question  

Stages of the creative process: 

The post I wrote about the creative process would be great to read. In that post there are also links to  two other posts about how to stay creative. They are all good reads and I recommend them all!

Jess

July 21 2014, 09:50 AM

80 notes  Filed Under:  posts  architecture  theory  architectural theory  read  reading  design  architect  book  books  

Reading architectural theory can be difficult

I love reading and I especially love reading theory but even for someone like me who enjoys it, it sometimes gets difficult to decipher. 

It takes me forever to get through a chapter, let alone a complete book. I’m finding myself having to read a required book by September and two other ones I want to finish before I start thesis. But I have to say that it’s taking me longer than I expected with not only because work and life gets in the way but because I constantly have to stop and keep re-reading things over and over to fully grasp the meaning.

A co-worker gave me a really great tip today that I’m going to start doing and I wanted to share with you all in case you have difficulties with reading theory as well.

Read the whole chapter in one go. It’s like watching a movie for the first time, you’re not going to pause and re-wind constantly… you’re going to keep watching. With reading in one pass, you grasp the overall message of the chapter, you understand the arch of the message.

Then re-read the chapter. The second time around allows you to pick up the details that you missed, just like in a movie. This saves you a lot of time compared to when you constantly stop yourself and keep re-reading sentences over and over again. 

July 21 2014, 07:44 AM

10 notes  Filed Under:  question  architecture  
Anonymous: Hey! In your opinion, is it better to have a Macbook or an other laptop of a different brand in architecture studies? Thank you, your tumblr makes me laugh by the way ;)

I only have one opinion and that is a Macbook Pro since I haven’t used anything else. Some programs do not work on Macs and that’s a small issue. I think the screen resolution is much clearer and better quality than pc.

But in the Resourceful Links tab there are plenty of posts you can look through that have laptop recommendations

Jess

July 20 2014, 03:20 PM

212 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  
Want #architecture

Want #architecture

July 20 2014, 02:09 PM

24 notes  
Lego Boston City Hall.

Lego Boston City Hall.

July 17 2014, 05:02 PM

14 notes  Filed Under:  admin post  fyi  architecture  

Navigating this blog

I’m trying to organize this blog so one can easily navigate through it.

Since Tumblr automatically puts everything I post/reblog on one page I’ve been putting separate pages in the Navigation section of the site.

Posts Which are posts I write or articles I share about architecture, creativity, inspiration, etc.

Submissions Where one could find all the witty statements of architecture life

Questions Answered All questions I’ve answered are located here and are a great resource to browse through

Resourceful Links Relative information for architecture students

July 17 2014, 11:29 AM

359 notes   •  VIA: archistudent   •   SOURCE: archistudent
Filed Under:  architecture  exactly  

Working into the night.

archistudent:

10pm: Well let’s try to make a model of a set of modules showing the structure and materials. 

12am: Well let’s try to make a model of just one module showing the structure and materials. 

1am: Well let’s try to make the framework and maybe a simple trace paper facade. 

2am: Well let’s try to make the framework.

3am: Well let’s try to make part of the framework.

4am: Well let’s try.

5am: Well.

July 16 2014, 03:48 PM

191 notes   •  VIA: gurblah   •   SOURCE: gurblah
Filed Under:  architecture  hahaha  yes  

Finally coming up with a good concept

gurblah:

image

July 16 2014, 03:37 PM

47 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  architorture  archi  architect  question  studio  design  architecture school  uni  late  night  
I’m honestly the worst person to be asked this question! I can’t stay up unless I’m extremely focused. As soon as my concentration is broken I remember how tired I am and call it quits! Sad I know.
What I usually do to stay in the zone is listen to podcasts/shows that I’ve seen about a thousand times. This type of background noise gets me more in the zone than music for some reason. I tend to put on my favorite shows on Netflix on replay (Psych and White Collar typically) or I have my favorite Youtube playlist on repeat (Sourcefed Nerd Table Talk, I love them). Since I’ve seen all of the episodes, I don’t need to actually be paying attention and it won’t really tear me away from my work since I’ve seen it already.
That’s just how I stay focused and tend to stay up longer.
What are your habits or rituals?

I’m honestly the worst person to be asked this question! I can’t stay up unless I’m extremely focused. As soon as my concentration is broken I remember how tired I am and call it quits! Sad I know.

What I usually do to stay in the zone is listen to podcasts/shows that I’ve seen about a thousand times. This type of background noise gets me more in the zone than music for some reason. I tend to put on my favorite shows on Netflix on replay (Psych and White Collar typically) or I have my favorite Youtube playlist on repeat (Sourcefed Nerd Table Talk, I love them). Since I’ve seen all of the episodes, I don’t need to actually be paying attention and it won’t really tear me away from my work since I’ve seen it already.

That’s just how I stay focused and tend to stay up longer.

What are your habits or rituals?

July 16 2014, 02:14 PM

28 notes  Filed Under:  architecture  archiect  architorture  studio  design  question  tattoo  tattoos  
It really depends on where you are from and the culture that you’re surrounded in. For instance west coast and east coast have completely different ethics. I’m sure visible tattoos are probably ok in the west (just my assumption, correct me if I’m wrong), but here in the east coast it’s un-professional.
This infographic is pretty funny but shows the difference in ethics: http://visual.ly/modern-business-man
It also depends on what industry you’re going into. For instance I’m in construction and I work in the office so it’s a professional setting. But if you’re working in a very creative studio for designers, I think it’s much more acceptable.

Jess

It really depends on where you are from and the culture that you’re surrounded in. For instance west coast and east coast have completely different ethics. I’m sure visible tattoos are probably ok in the west (just my assumption, correct me if I’m wrong), but here in the east coast it’s un-professional.

This infographic is pretty funny but shows the difference in ethics: http://visual.ly/modern-business-man

It also depends on what industry you’re going into. For instance I’m in construction and I work in the office so it’s a professional setting. But if you’re working in a very creative studio for designers, I think it’s much more acceptable.

Jess

July 16 2014, 01:57 PM


In Uganda Africa, student we are not allowed to do all night in our studio…..we end up here in our hostel rooms.
Submitted by: Musiimenta Ian 

Yeah I know what you mean, our studio is only open till 2am!
Thanks for sharing your photo!

In Uganda Africa, student we are not allowed to do all night in our studio…..we end up here in our hostel rooms.

Submitted by: Musiimenta Ian 

Yeah I know what you mean, our studio is only open till 2am!

Thanks for sharing your photo!

July 14 2014, 03:01 PM

submitted  by: blah

submitted  by: blah